Support grants for community venues who have closed due to Covid-19

Business support grants

Do you run a community centre or other community facility? Business support grants are available for voluntary and community organisations in Kirklees who generate a significant part of their income through activity that has been legally forced to close (or has been significantly impacted) due to Covid-19 restrictions.

You could apply for financial support if:

  • You have been required to close your community venue due to Covid-19 restrictions.
  • Your organisation has remained open but has been severely impacted by Covid-19 restrictions.
  • You have lost income due to the restrictions, such as losing out on hall hire fees or not being able to operate a café or other community facility.

What kind of organisation can apply?

Support is available for:

  • community centres
  • community buildings
  • community facilities
  • faith-based venues

There is more than one type of support grant available depending on your circumstances. Please read the eligibility criteria carefully before applying. You could be eligible for support whether or not you usually pay business rates. The amount of funding will depend on your circumstances.


What about other organisations?

This is business funding, which is also available for community organisations who have a commercial aspect to their work. Not every type of community activity can be supported (for example, the grant cannot be used to replace income from donations). If you’ve lost vital income due to Covid-19, please check to see if you can apply.

Kirklees Council are continuing to work closely with Third Sector Leaders Kirklees on other ways to support voluntary and community organisations over the coming months. If you’re not eligible for a business support grant, there may be other ways that we can help.


Find out more and ask for advice

If you’d like advice about whether your voluntary or community organisation is eligible for a business support grant, please contact:

business.enquiries@kirklees.gov.uk

You can find more information and online application forms at:

Coronavirus: Help for businesses

 

Third Sector Leaders Kirklees offer free advice and support for voluntary and community organisations and can connect you to other people and organisations:
Third Sector Leaders Kirklees


Coronavirus Emergency Fund for Kirklees – reopen

One Community foundation

Update 16th December 2020: This fund is currently paused. Please check for the latest info:

Coronavirus Emergency Fund


The Coronavirus Emergency Fund is reopen for applications. Grants are available from the One Community Foundation for a period up to March 31st 2021 – you must be able to spend your grant during this time.

One Community Foundation understands the impact that the Coronavirus is having on communities. With this in mind, the Foundation and their donors have come together to provide a response. They are keen to make sure that the organisations helping those most affected get the support that they need, so have reopened the Coronavirus Emergency Fund in partnership with NET (National Emergencies Trust).

How much can you apply for?

  • £5,000 for charitable organisations
  • £10,000 for Hubs or Anchor organisations (including those supporting mutual aid groups).

You must be able to spend all of your grant by March 2021.

Who can apply?

Voluntary and community organisations, including:

  • registered charities, including charitable incorporated organisations
  • constituted organisations and non-registered charities
  • community interest companies and community benefit societies
  • parish and town councils
  • Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs)
  • Churches and faith organisations

What can be funded?

The cost of food and hygiene products, delivery costs, for example, petrol, PPE and additional cleaning costs, volunteer costs responding to the effects of the crisis, staffing cost relating to the project, equipment costs etc. You can find the latest info and guidelines on the One Community website:

Coronavirus Emergency Fund

 


Tier 3 guidance about community buildings, support groups and leafleting

What tier 3 restrictions mean for local organisations

Community centres and halls

Community buildings can be used for permitted, organised gatherings but should not host events for private hire or be used for social gatherings.

Permitted gatherings could include, but are not limited to:

  • Work purposes or provision of voluntary or charitable services
  • Providing emergency assistance
  • Enabling one or more people in the gathering to avoid injury or illness, or to escape a risk of harm
  • Providing care or assistance to a vulnerable person or a person who has a disability

When deciding whether to open you must consider:

  • Can you meet your outcomes or deliver your service or activities online? This remains the safest way to operate services and classes.
  • If you can’t deliver online – can you run some, or all of your activities, outside?
  • Is it necessary that you meet face to face during this time?

If it is necessary to meet indoors:

  • You need to complete a risk assessment specific to your activity and premises
  • You must implement all reasonable measures to prevent the spread of the virus
  • You must keep a record of attendance for Test and Trace
  • Keep your risk assessment on site, with a named responsible person.

If you open, you must also consider:

  • Take all the usual precautions like social distancing, hand washing or sanitising and wearing face coverings.
  • It is not advisable to share equipment of any kind.
  • You must not provide or sell communal refreshments – although people can bring their own.
  • Cafe facilities must remain closed or offer take away (off site) only.

Please remember, reducing social contact with people from outside of our households and support bubbles is key to protecting ourselves, our loved ones and the wider community.


 

Support groups

Some support groups can meet. Up to 15 participants are allowed. Under-5s do not count towards the 15 person limit.

  • They must be formally organised groups
  • They can provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support, where they have to take place in person
  • They can’t meet in private houses
  • They may meet in community centres, which can open as long as they are COVID-safe, have undertaken a risk assessment and keep a record for Test and Trace.

When deciding whether to run a face-to-face support group you must consider:

  • Can you meet your outcomes or deliver your service or activities online? This remains the safest way to operate services and classes.
  • If you can’t deliver online – can you run some, or all of your activities, outside?
  • Is it necessary that you meet face to face during this time?

If you open, you must also consider:

  • Take all the usual precautions like social distancing, hand washing or sanitising and wearing face coverings.
  • It is not advisable to share equipment of any kind.
  • You must not provide or sell communal refreshments – although people can bring their own.
  • Cafe facilities must remain closed or offer take away (off site) only.

Please remember, reducing social contact with people from outside of our households and support bubbles is key to protecting ourselves, our loved ones and the wider community.


 

Leafleting

Leafleting is permitted but when deciding whether to do it you must consider:

  • Can you meet your outcomes online? This remains the safest way to operate
  • Is it necessary that you meet face-to-face during this time?

If it is necessary to take part in leafleting:

  • You need to complete a risk assessment specific to your activity
  • You must implement all reasonable measures to prevent the spread of the virus
  • Keep your risk assessment with you at all times.

Please remember, reducing social contact with people from outside of our households and support bubbles is key to protecting ourselves, our loved ones and the wider community.


 

COVID-19 restrictions in Kirklees

Community buildings and activities

The ‘rule of 6’ and community buildings

stay two metres apart where possible

If you’re in the process of trying to re-open your community building safely, please take a few minutes to read through the latest guidance. We’ve included links to Government updates and an example risk assessment document.

The Government have updated the rules for social distancing for meeting people indoors and outdoors.

From 14th September 2020, people from different households must not meet in groups of more than 6, either indoors or outdoors. This limit does not apply to meetings of a single household group or support bubble which is more than 6 people.

If you live in an area subject to local restrictions, we continue to advise that you should not:

  • socialise with people who you do not live with, unless they’re in your support bubble, in any public venue. This applies to inside and outside of the affected areas. Examples of public venues include pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops, places of worship, community centres, leisure and entertainment venues, or visitor attractions and parks.
  • visit friends or family in care homes, other than in exceptional circumstances. Care homes should restrict visits to exceptional circumstances only.

The ‘rule of 6’ doesn’t apply to local restriction areas. Community centres within areas that are under local restriction should take steps to make sure people do not socialise with people who they do not live with, in line with Covid-19 secure guidance.

In areas where there are local restrictions, risk assessment is key. This might mean it is not viable for you to open your community building. Nurseries running from community centres are subject to the government guidance on early years settings.

If you are in an area where there are no local restrictions, community facilities can host more than 6 people in total, but no-one should visit or socialise in a group of more than 6 – and you must follow the Covid-19 secure guidelines and ensure you have the appropriate risk assessments.

 


Government links and example risk assessment

Updated, 15th September 2020

The Government have updated their guidance for community facilities since we published this post. This new guidance says that activities and social groups where there is a significant likelihood of groups mixing and socialising (and where it will be difficult to prevent mingling and therefore breaking the law) should not take place in a community facility.

We encourage you to read Section 3c in this latest Government guidance for community facilities:

Guidance for the safe use of multi-purpose community facilities


Further information on social contact rules, social distancing and the exemptions that exist can be found on the UK Government website. We encourage you to read Section 3:

Guidance on meeting with others safely


These rules will not apply to workplaces or education settings, alongside other exemptions. There is more information on the UK Government website.

Details on what has changed


 

People who are using Covid-19 secure community facilities should limit their social interactions with anyone who they do not live with. Where activities have 6 or more people participating (where it is safe to do so and capacity permits) it is important for all parties to maintain social distancing, 2 metres or 1 metre apart, with actions taken to reduce the risk of transmission (where 2 metres is not viable) between households. You should encourage the use of face coverings and good hand hygiene on entering premises and throughout a person’s visit.



Most community buildings can continue to open, provided that you follow the guidance.
However, if direct social interaction is key to the activity (and if the activity is not a support group such as victim support or mental health groups) then you probably shouldn’t be doing it.

Gatherings of over 30 in public outdoor space are not allowed in Kirklees at this time.

Please feel free to use this risk assessment as learning to support you to complete your own risk assessments:

Thornton Lodge Community Centre risk assessment (Doc)

 


Who to contact for advice

Local organisations are welcome to contact Third Sector Leaders Kirklees if you have questions about safely re-opening your community building.

Bridget Hughes – bridget@tslkirklees.org.uk – 07540 434 573

Becky Bracey – becky@tslkirklees.org.uk – 07776 588 691

 

Community Response Hubs – take part in our evaluation

hand reaching out behind glass

Many people have contributed to the amazing community response to Covid-19 in our local places. Mutual aid groups, voluntary and community organisations, ward councillors, Kirklees Council officers, volunteers and partners have been working alongside each other to keep people safe. We are all part of the co-ordinated Community Response in Kirklees – and we all have a stake in our local places.

Our response has been supported through place-based Community Response Hubs, with people working together in new ways. We really value the relationships that have been so vital for this work. We want to grow and strengthen those relationships as part of our recovery and for the future. We are still in the very early stages of beginning to work with and alongside citizens in a meaningful way in our local places. Your insights can help us go much further.

On behalf of our Place Based Working Board (which includes council, voluntary sector and health colleagues), I’d like to ask for your support in helping us to think about what has gone well and not so well with the hubs.

How to take part

If you’ve been part of the co-ordinated Community Response in our local places, please take part in the Community Response Hubs Evaluation by 21st August 2020 to share your personal experiences:

Community Response Hubs Evaluation – take part now

Thank you for helping us learn how we can work together well in our local places in the future – and thank you for everything you’re doing to help keep people safe.

St. Andrew’s Church Liversedge – our food box network

Volunteers at St Andrew's Methodist Church

In spring 2020, Kirklees Council more than doubled the funding that ward councillors have available to support local projects in their area. Through this extra £30,000 of funding per ward, councillors are able to support the groups, projects and volunteers who are such a vital part of the community response to Covid-19. We’re sharing some stories from different wards, so you can see how councillors are using these funds in our local places.

The relationships councillors have with people in their communities, and their local knowledge, continues to be an important part of helping citizens in our local places respond to Covid-19.

Like many local groups and organisations, volunteers from St. Andrew’s Methodist Church in Liversedge realised that if they were going to set up a project to help their community, they were going to have to act fast to get it off the ground before lockdown happened. Their aim was to be ready to provide food boxes to vulnerable people across parts of North Kirklees.

Administered by Wesley Playhouse Ltd (as part of the Howden Clough Methodist Church in Birstall) the project quickly brought together representatives of other churches in North Kirklees, who together made a plan for the food box network.

Caroline Holt, one of the lead organisers, explained how the project came about and what they’ve achieved by working together with other partners. Funding from local councillors has been important in supporting their work.

“I was approached by a local ward councillor, Cllr Lisa Holmes. She has a really good knowledge of the communities and knew that through the network of churches something could happen. Churches covering the North Kirklees circuit quickly became part of the project.

“Getting funding to run a project under normal circumstances isn’t always easy. The bureaucracy involved can really hold things up. Cllr Holmes explained local ward councillors had been given extra funding so they could tackle issues more quickly. This allowed us to focus on getting the project up and running with minimal time wasted on form filling.

“We were keen to do things properly though, so made sure we consulted with parishioners on what they thought would be more useful to go in food boxes. From this we were able to work out the likely costs and let the councillors know how much funding we thought we’d need.

“We wrote a business plan to give ourselves some structure and an ability to demonstrate our approach. The councillors from Liversedge and Gomersal ward and Mirfield ward initially gave us £5,000 between them. They offered reassurance too though, that if the numbers of people requiring our help increased, they would support us with additional funding.

“The trust they showed in us to deliver a project like this was really important. We would have done something to support our communities anyway, but the time taken to do this would have been time lost when people really needed our help.”

As well as the benefit of having a good relationship with the councillors, Caroline also told us about the importance of managing the project properly and the support from other parts of the community.

“We knew it was important we reached the right people, so relied in part on referrals from the Covid-19 Community Response phone line set up by Kirklees Council. In this way, we knew the referrals we were getting were from people in need and were at a level of need we could definitely help with. We had so many people come forward to volunteer that we couldn’t even use all of them. This shows how brilliant the community response has been.

9E59F213-43F1-4A5E-BA12-D910D2FC8E4F
Mav Morse taking a request

“Some people gave up their time every day, such as Liz and Richard Sands, along with Mav Morse who manned the phone line. We’re also hugely grateful to Steve Dawson of Tesco and Wendy Clough of Morrisons supermarkets, whose local branches gave us donations of food, meaning the funding we did have could go a lot further. It probably doubled the length of the project.

“In all, throughout the lockdown, we’ve helped over 200 households and continue to help some. We’ll keep helping them until we know they’re no longer vulnerable, but will also encourage them to take back their independence as time goes by.

“The success of the project and the benefits to our communities shows why it’s good for groups to have a good relationship with your local councillors. The councillors took the initiative in approaching us, trusted that we could help and gave us the funding to deliver something much needed in our communities at the time.”

Ward project budgets – your councillors can help

Learn more about councillors

 

The Welcome Centre – help with food and more

The Welcome Centre food bank and more

Do you know someone who needs help to get food?

The Welcome Centre is a food bank and more. This independent charity can help anyone in Huddersfield and South Kirklees. They can supply food, toiletries and household cleaning items. The Welcome Centre also offer advice and guidance.

If you know someone who cannot buy the food, toiletries or other household items they need, please advise them to contact someone who can make a referral for them (or seek their permission to contact someone on their behalf). This person could be their GP, teacher, health visitor, housing worker, counsellor or church.

These organisations can also offer help and can make a referral for a food parcel if necessary:

  • Local Welfare Provision team at Kirklees Council: 01484 414 782
  • The Mission advice workers: 01484 421 461
  • Kirklees Citizens Advice: 0344 848 7970

Advice leaflets

Do you need help to get food? (PDF)

More than a food bank (PDF)

 

Find out more

The Welcome Centre

How to get help from the Welcome Centre

 


We haven’t beaten the virus… yet

stay two metres apart where possible

Covid-19 is still in our communities. The only way to eliminate it is to stop it from spreading.

You can play your part by:

Staying 2 metres apart, washing your hands, staying away from crowds, wearing a face covering, isolating if you show symptoms and following instructions from the NHS Test and Trace.

You can also contribute to the gathering of local insight through this online form:

Gathering local insight about Coronavirus

It’s really helpful if as many people as possible can contribute their local insight.

You can also report unsafe practices, incidents or planned events through this online form:

Reporting an incident which increases the risk of spreading Coronavirus

 


Preventing an outbreak

We need your help to prevent the spread of coronavirus (Covid-19)

Download our advice posters

Kirklees Covid-19 advice posters (PDF)

 

Arabic poster (PDF)            اضغط هنا للغة العربية
Albanian poster (PDF)         klikoni këtu për shqip
Guajarati poster (PDF) ગુઆજરાતી માટે અહીં ક્લિક કરો 
Farsi poster (PDF)                برای فارسی اینجا را کلیک کنید
Hungarian poster (PDF)     Kattintson ide a Magyar
Kurdish poster (PDF)          لێرە كليك بكە بۆ كور د ى
Mandarin poster (PDF)      点击这里查看普通话 
Polish poster (PDF)             Kliknij tu, aby wybrać j. polski 
Romanian poster (PDF)     apăsați aici pentru limba română 
Spanish poster (PDF)         Pulse aquí para Español’ 
Urdu poster (PDF)              اردو کے لئے یہاں کلک کریں 

 

Coronavirus: Information in other languages

Covid-19 Translated information – Kirklees Welcomes blog

 

Share an object that can tell a story about Covid-19

pebble painted with NHS logo

We are living through history – the Covid-19 pandemic has touched everyone’s lives and has made big changes to some.

Kirklees Museums and Galleries want to know more about your experiences, both positive and negative. We collect objects and the stories connected to them in order to help people in the future understand events and how they have affected people in local places across Kirklees.

So, what could we collect? Well, we are particularly interested in objects which say something about the pandemic locally. Are you a volunteer or keyworker who has experienced life changing times? Has home-working meant big changes for you, or perhaps you’ve had to adapt and spend your time in a different way? Perhaps you have a unique way of counting the days of lockdown, or maybe you have benefitted from the kindness of others supporting you. Perhaps you are a local business who are now manufacturing things for the NHS.

We are sure there will be many different ideas that capture an important part of this crisis. However, we cannot collect everything that we’re offered, as we have very limited resources and every object needs to fit with our collections policy. But we would like to hear from you if you have an object with a story, which really says something important about the Covid-19 pandemic and its effect on people in our local places.

How to contribute

Please contact museumsandgalleries@kirklees.gov.uk if you have any objects you would like to donate to Kirklees Museums and Galleries which you think will help to tell the story of the pandemic to future generations. Please also email us if you would like to read our full Collections Policy.

Our colleagues at West Yorkshire Archives are interested in collecting any paper-based items which tell a story about the local response in Kirklees – anything from diaries to NHS rainbows.

You can find out more on their blog:

Living through history – West Yorkshire Archives

 

Shelley’s mutual aid story – looking out for each other

Shelley Village Hall

The story of Shelley village’s community response is about kindness, new connections and how Covid-19 has perhaps made us look at our local places in different ways. It’s a story that may be familiar to those who have been directly involved with their own mutual aid group.

Many people in our local places have benefitted from the actions of dedicated mutual aid group volunteers, who have helped to deliver essential supplies such as food shopping and prescriptions. When a potential lockdown began to look likely, it prompted some active residents of Shelley village to come together and form their own mutual aid group. We spoke to Ann Priestman from Shelley Community Association about how everything unfolded…

Ann“There was a core group of people from the village including the vicar, pub landlord, Brownie leader, leader of the mother and baby group and a resident who is a community first responder with the paramedics, along with several other active residents.

“Within just a couple of hours we had assigned roles. Two volunteers to coordinate and lead the response. Someone responsible for social media and the website. We knew it was important to communicate the offer of support to all residents, not just those online, so we developed a leaflet that could be delivered to every household.

“A group of eight volunteers were able to get out and deliver the leaflets and it couldn’t have come at a better time. Lockdown had just been announced and people were already feeling scared and concerned about how they would get food and prescriptions. The leaflet gave them reassurance that there was help in the local community.”

This was just the beginning of the community response from Shelley village. The landlord from the village pub set up a small farmers market so residents had access to fresh fruit and vegetables along with other produce. He also did deliveries to those who were shielding. The Brownies made happy postcards and painted rocks which they put around the village.

A call out for more help generated a whole team of extra volunteers. Over the next few weeks these volunteers delivered nearly 150 prescriptions and made almost 50 shopping deliveries. Ann explained that was not all, and the figures don’t necessarily reflect the reality.

“Once a volunteer had been matched to support a resident, future deliveries were often worked out between them. Volunteers also started to help residents with other things such as mowing lawns or tidying gardens. One couple even took a resident to all of her hospital appointments.”

The volunteer team also worked closely with the Denby Dale Centre, one of eight community anchor organisations across Kirklees, to help with some of the shopping requests.

“The Denby Dale Centre were great, particularly when residents could only pay for shopping using cash. The centre had a system in place which meant transactions could be done transparently for residents and the volunteers helping them.”

We asked what impact lockdown has had on Shelley village overall. Is there a sense that community links have strengthened? Ann explained her thoughts to us:

“People have been saying on Facebook and in conversation this is a great place to live and people are really thankful that they are getting help in their village. There is a sense that people are looking out for each other and their neighbours. People are talking to each other who they wouldn’t normally. They have connected and bonded.”

In October 2019 Ann was one of a group of volunteers leading the Ask Shelley conversations, which asked what life is like in Shelley village. Supported by the Democracy Service at Kirklees Council, Ask Shelley is one of a growing number of ongoing How Good Is Our Place activities in our local places. This programme of work recognises that citizens want to have more dialogue about what matters in our local places, and more of a voice in what happens here.

Ann told us that she thinks recent events will have changed how some people think about Shelley:

“During the Ask Shelley activities, some of the findings were a little negative about the village not having many facilities and some residents feeling that other surrounding villages had more to offer. I believe if the Ask Shelley engagement was carried out today it would be a lot more positive, as people have rediscovered their pride for the village.”

Volunteers in Shelley have been working on an action plan for the village, based on their conversations, which will be shared online soon.

Ask Shelley